16
Jan

PHOTOS OF MY BROTHER PHIL’S DRUG STORES AND DOX LIQUOR

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 On September 14, 2009, I posted memories of my brother’s three drug stores–Standard Pharmacy 7th and S Street,N.W., Economy Pharmacy, 9th and U Street,N.W., and Boyd’s Pharmacy, Georgia and Kenyon Street,N.W., and Dox Liquor on 7th and S Street,N.W., across the street from the previous drug-liquor store.

  As previously mentioned, the original Standard Pharmacy, 7th and S Street,N.W., also had a liquor department. However, when my brother decided to build across the street, a D.C. governing department, informed him, he could not combine the pharmacy items with the liquor.

   Because my brother as a pharmacist was always addressed as “DOC”, he called the liquor store, “DOX LIQUOR.”

 On one sales promotion, my brother invited the former heavy weight boxing champion of the world, Joe Louis. His photos appear.

Links to the photos of my brother’s drug stores and “DOX” liquor follow:

Picture of Phil, Joe Louis and wife Lil

Picture of Phil in front of Dox Liquor

Picture of Phil’s wife Lil working the cash register

Picture of Joe Louis at Dox Liquor

Picture of Joe Louis and Phil at Dox Liquor

Pictures of Dox Liquor Advertisements

Picture of Doc’s employees at Boyd’s Pharmacy

Picture of Boyd’s Pharmacy (outside)

Picture of Boyd’s Pharmacy (inside)

Picture of Standard Pharmacy 7th and S Street

13
Sep

REMEMBERING PENTAGON TERRORIST ATTACK ON SEPTEMBER 11, 2014

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Today is September 11, 2014 and time again to remember the terrorist attacks  that occurred in some major cities on September 11, 2011.

Besides the devastating terrorist attack on the World Trade Center, I especially recall the terrorist attack on a portion of the well known Pentagon building,recognized

as the largest office building in the world.

I especially will always remember the attack on a portion of the Pentagon, because I began working on the premises where it was being constructed in 1942.

After graduating from Central High in D.C. on June 1941, I worked at the Hecht Company department store, 7th and F Street, N.W. as a stock man, and attended George Washington

University in the evenings.

When I attended Central High, my brother Phil, suggested to me that I take a typing course, because it could always come in handy.

I followed his suggestion.

I applied to a government facility that announced it was hiring clerk typists to work in Virginia. I applied to that facility which was a branch of the US Engineers, and was hired

as a typist. I expected to be working in a office building, but was directed to a small wooden Lincoln type shack. I was told this call a time shack, and was the location  where all

construction employees would report to, every morning so that their exact work hour would be recorded. I typed up all the names of the carpenters, electricians, sheet metal employees,

etc who visited the time shack and were checked in.

I still recall that the hourly page for carpenters when I began work was $1.62 1/2 an hour..

The principal contractor for this huge building was John McShain who worked with the US Engineers.

I left my job in March 1943 when I was summoned to join the Army.

When I heard of the unexpected attack on a portion of the Pentagon, I was petrified.

World problems have changed on the 2014 anniversary of the 2011 terrorist attack.
On September 11, 2014, the American president Obama announced that the US would join with friendly country to destroy Isil, a new group that has emerged

in Iraq and Syria, and already chopped off the heads of two American Journalists.President Obama announced that our country and other friendly countries would

perform air attacks in the area of Syria to wipe out this cruel group of murderers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09
Sep

WALKING TOUR OF OLD SOUTHWEST, D.C., MAY 21, 2006

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WALKING TOUR OF OLD SOUTHWEST, D.C., MAY 21, 2006

      Sometime ago, I was asked by Rabbis Herzfeld and Pollak of my synagogue, Ohev Sholom – The National Synagogue to lead a walking tour in portions of Southwest D.C. The Rabbis knew that I had grown up in SW and attended Congregation Talmud Torah, our original place of worship that later merged with another synagogue, and finally after some moves built the present synagogue at 16th and Jonquil Street, N.W.

       With help from the Jewish Historical Society, Martin Luther King Library, DC Historical Society, DC Historians Jane Levey, and Carol Kolker, SW Neighborhood Assembly representatives Perry Klein and Ron McBee, Minister Brian Hamilton, Carolyn Crouch of Washington Walks, I was able to assemble data and photographs that enabled me to relate my memories of people and places who lived and worked in SW during the 30’s and parts of the 40’s.

         I am happy to report that our tour was a success with approximately 50 to 75 people joining our walk.

                   Rabbi Pollak      Larry Rosen

                                  TOUR PRESENTATION

        Welcome to our SW DC tour. I thank past and present SW residents and everyone for joining us.

        I’m Larry Rosen who, together with my family arrived here in 1927 from Cheyenne, Wyoming, moving into 713 4½ Street, SW, the home previously occupied by Rabbi Yoelson, father of the famous entertainer, Al Jolson.

 

      Originally, this SW section was called “the Island” because it was isolated from the rest of Washington by a canal that was later filled.

        Around 1850, a handful of Jews who recently arrived from Germany opened a few little stores in Southwest, and settled there. Then around 1900 an influx of Russian and Polish Jews arrived in the area, growing to about 190 families in 1920.

       Because little capital was required to open a grocery, most of the immigrants entered this business, borrowing money from relatives or from anywhere else.

       Many newcomers also opened dry goods stores (variety of clothing), as well as tailor, shoe repair, and variety shops with the majority of the proprietors sleeping either behind or above their stores. To make a living, store-owners had to keep their businesses open 12 or more hours a day.

        Many neighborhood Afro-Americans patronized the many mom and pop stores, and I

recall that there existed little crime in SW and that black, white and other ethnic residents all got along.

        Around 1954, massive redevelopment began in SW, with all the dwellings and businesses disappearing by 1961.

      The construction of this Waterfront Mall, the Metrorail and Southwest Freeway, triggered many changes on SW blocks.

        While most tours consist of visiting modern office buildings, luxury homes, universities etc., our tour will focus on the approximate 5 busiest 4½ Street blocks, recalling the life-styles and my memories of some former residents and landmarks.

        We are now standing on what was part of 4½ Street with M on our left and the next street being I. Fourth and L, K, H and F Streets have vanished.

 

                                           MEMORIES

                         900 BLOCK BETWEEN I AND K STREET

        I attended Bowen Elementary School on K Street between 3rd and 4th Street. I recall lots of activities every May Day.

 

921 LEWIS SHOE REPAIR

       The entire family was active in community affairs. Mel Lewis served many terms as

president of Ohev Sholom – The National Synagogue, now resides in Israel. Rose Glazer Lewis was a neighborhood Sunday school teacher.

        When the Lewis family moved out, the Friedman family moved in, also operating a shoe repair shop. Ben and Eddie Friedman have been long-life friends of mine, and Eddie and I were once partners in two small businesses.

911 MARKOWITZ HARDWARE

        I attended Junior High with Irving Markowitz, who became a great trumpet player and joined the well known big bands of Harry James, Glen Miller and others, and was known in the industry as “Marky”.

 

908 TED’S PAWNBROKERS

         Ted operated his business next to his father’s used furniture store. I met Ted when he first arrived from Iowa, and we became good friends. In 1946, I occasionally helped him out in his business. I recall that at this time, the numbers game was popular, similar to today’s lottery, betting on the outcome of three numbers. The difference was that at this time the pastime was “technically” illegal, results being obtained from horse race results. I don’t recall the police authorities arresting many participants. NO Mega Million Games back in those days.

 

907 SNIDER MEATS

      Operated by Louis Snider, father of Jerry Snider, proprietor of the well known “Snider’s Super Market”, 1936 Seminary Road, Silver Spring, Maryland.

 

903 MISS MINNIE’S VARIETY

      Popular selection of penny candy and snacks.

 

901 BASS DRUGS, THEN PAUL’S DRUG & LIQUOR

901 DRUG STORE LOCATION EVEN AROUND 1900

       After Paul’s Drug Store had to move, he moved his liquor license to 5205 Wisconsin Avenue, D.C. and opened exclusive “PAUL’S LIQUOR.” Store sold to Bellman family, my former DC neighbors.

 BOY’S CLUB # 4

        Located on I Street, between 4th and 6th, I played many games of ping pong. Once a losing opponent threw his paddle at me, but fortunately he missed. He apologized.

                                 800 BLOCK BETWEEN H & I

 825 ATKIN GROCERY

       More life-long friends, Joe Sherr, Sid and Harry Atkin. I once worked part-time with Harry Atkin in Business Sales.

 818 JEWELL THEATER

      Movie house—Segregated policy during 30’s and 40’s. Open to Afro-American public who were not admitted to movie houses attended by white public.

 

812 YUTER TAILOR SHOP

       Ann Yuter is a long-time member of Ohev Sholom – The National Synagogue. Her

brother Morris lives in Annapolis.

 807 GREENBAUM’S BAKERY LATER RUBINSTEIN BAKERY

       Great Jelly donuts, and 11-cent delicious rye bread. Donuts, in my opinion were tastier than “Dunkin Donuts” and less expensive.

 801 HYATT CLOTHING

       During World WAR II, my brother Sam, while in the Army and stationed in Richmond, Virginia, needed an apartment. By chance he met Sid and Lou Hyatt who were in the real estate business, and they came to the rescue.

                                700 BLOCK BETWEEN H & G

 CORNER 4th AND G AMERICAN FILLING STATION

       $3.00 could possibly fill most of the gas tank. During World War II, ration tickets needed to purchase gas. No self-service or credit cards. Oil and other fluids checked without request.

 723 VORONOFF HARDWARE

      Rolls of oil cloth, popular floor covering, always displayed outside on the street.

 721 ROSENBERG CLOTHING

        Mr. Rosenberg, one of the founders of Talmud Torah Congregation and very active. One of his daughters worked in the White House.

 716 SCHNEIDER HARDWARE

        Always well-displayed window, with running electric trains available during Xmas season.

        During SW redevelopment, when asked to vacate premises, she and fellow store-owner Max Morris sued with the case going all the way to Supreme Court. They lost their case in 1954 when the Court ruled the Redevelopment Land Agency could destroy private buildings in order to improve the overall neighborhood.

 

722 RUBINSTEIN VARIETY

      Headquarters for candy, snow balls, ice cream, snacks. Lou Rubinstein and I both members of the same Jewish War Veterans post.

 

715 MILLER TINNER

       Similar to sheet metal shop. Family arrived from Lithuania and spoke only Yiddish. Fortunately I could speak that language. Later when they learned the language, I would visit the family and join them when they listened to a daily radio program, called “Jack Armstrong, the All American Boy”, sponsored by Wheaties, “Breakfast of Champions.”

       When the Millers moved out, the Friedmans moved in, operating a shoe repair. I remember their son Albert always wore a white shirt.

 

713 ROSEN SHOCHET AND MOHEL

        My father’s profession was a “Shochet and Mohel” – As a Shochet, he slaughtered poultry in a prescribed manner according to Jewish law, and as a mohel, he performed circumcisions. The going price to kill and pluck the feathers of a chicken was 15 cents. At first, my Dad worked in the back yard, but later he worked in a corner section of Paul Clarke’s live poultry store at 1105 Maine Avenue.

                                               

       This is me walking down 4th Street, carrying a chicken to deliver to a customer.

 

       When we first moved into 713 4½ Street, lighting was provided by gas jets protruding from the wall that did not produce good lighting—later we got regular electricity.

 

       We had no oil or gas heat—just coal, and my job was to occasionally bring coal from our garage into a separate small structure in the yard called a “summer kitchen” where the furnace and another stove were located. To get hot water it was necessary to light a hot water heater.

When we first moved into the house, we had no refrigerator. Like many folks, we had an ice box and had to wait for the ice man to bring in blocks of ice. Also, no washing machine—clothes were washed in tubs and later placed on clothes line to dry.

 

       Back in those days, we had no TV, VCR, DVD, PALM-PILOT, BLACKBERRIES, BLUEBERRIES etc. We did have a radio and an upright “Victrola” record player, the top of

which could be locked and used as a “mini-safe.”.  We had a telephone. I still remember the number, Franklin 4209. No area code, and no zip code necessary when mailing a letter with a 3 cent stamp.

 

       Rent was $40.00 a month. Better deal than some folks nowadays having to pay $20,000 or more for permanent parking spots in high-rise buildings.

 

 

                               Here is a photo with my father.

 

 

711 SAM THE BARBER

 

        Hair cuts were 25 cents. One of Sam’s barbers would sleep in one of the barber chairs at night and often would play solitaire at the store-front counter.

 

700 SHERMAN’S LIQUOR

 

       Mr. Sherman provided a neighborhood service when he would install loud-speakers on the outside of his store so that many SW residents who had no radio could listen to the broadcasting of champion Joe Louis’s prize fights. Huge crowds would gather every time Joe Louis had a match.

         In front of the store was a police call box, used when a police officer could summon a police car to send a vehicle to pick up a violator. (Cell phones were not yet on the scene).

 701 SANITARY GROCERY

       Later became Safeway. No self-service or check out counters. Each item to be purchased had to be called out to the clerk who would add up the total by adding machine or by hand.

 

                               600 BLOCK BETWEEN G & F

 

630-32 SPERLING’s MINI DEPARTMENT STORE

       Paul Sperling, active synagogue member, both at Talmud Torah and Ohev Shalom – The National Synagogue for many years. He now lives in Baltimore.

 

        Carol Kolker, who published an interesting dissertation on SW, interviewed Paul

Sperling for her work. Quoting from her dissertation, “Paul Sperling’s father Sam Sperling began work in America as a greenhorn peddler, on NY’s lower East Side. Later, he came to DC and rented a house at the corner of 4½ G St., opened small store. We worked as much as 20 hours a day. Within 10 years, Sperling bought the building next door, tore everything down and built big home. When kids came home from school, they did their homework, then helped their parents in the business. His mother did all the cooking and then she took care of the books and then she waited on customers. One day when he left for school, his mother was arranging a window display and when he returned home for lunch, “she had a baby.”

 

618 HORNSTEIN BUTCHER SHOP, later WEBBER’S BUTCHER SHOP – where we

bought our meat products.

 

609 MORGENSTEIN BAKERY – later sold to Rosenblum family.

 

607 VOLNER ANSHI SVART SYNAGOGUE

        Founded in 1908. Name eventually changed to Beth Shalom after moving to different locations. Now at 11825 Seven Locks Road, Potomac, MD. Prayers slightly different from Talmud Torah.

 

601 LIFSHITZ SHOCHET AND BUTCHER

        I was a frequent visitor to the family. I recall a tasty snack prepared by Mrs. Lifshitz. She would heat some butter in a frying pan. Everybody got a slice of bread and was invited to dip their bread in the melted butter – delicious.

 

622-624 SCHOOLER’S DRY GOODS, then liquor store at 624

      Purchased by Bernie Green. I worked part-time for Bernie.

 

476 F St. between 4th and 6th – Former home of Rabbi Joshua Klavan and family.

 

                               500 BLOCK BETWEEN F & E

 

523 JACK KLAVAN, PAWNBROKER

      Brother of Rabbi Joshua Klavan. Jack Klavan’s son Stanley became a judge.

 

516 CHERNIKOFF CLEANER

       Son Harry and I, as kids, rode three-wheel tricycles. Harry became first president of Share Tefilah Synagogue and when he worked for the VA, he assisted many World War II veterans in obtaining entitled benefits.

 

512 KEISER RESTAURANT

       Operated by Hymie Keiser, long-time acquaintance. Hymie had along career in the insurance industry.

                                              

                   CONGREGATION TALMUD TORAH 467 E St. SW

 

        Began in home of Isaac Levy on 4½ St. in 1880. Met in member’s homes until the synagogue was completed in 1903.

        Remained in E St. Building for almost 50 years until redevelopment, and then was razed. Moved to different locations, then merged with Ohev Shalom 5th and Eye St., finally moving into the present building in 1960 on 16th and Jonquil St. NW.

        Rabbi Moshe Horwitz served Talmud Torah from 1912 to 1935, then Rabbi Joshua Klavan became Rabbi in 1936 until his death in 1953 at which time, his son, Rabbi Hillel Klavan was appointed Rabbi and served for 48 years.

 

     Rabbi Shmuel Herzfeld, our current Rabbi, is doing a great job in bringing in many new members and providing interesting programs.

        Rabbi Yossi Pollak has, likewise, performed a great job as Assistant Rabbi.

        My father was the recording secretary of Talmud Torah Congregation from 1933 to 1944. His recorded minutes written in Yiddish are located in the Ohev Sholom – The National

Synagogue’s memorabilia room.

 

      Here’s a translation of a small portion of a meeting dated December 28, 1941, by Doctor Chana Benjamin, daughter of Barbara and Leonard Goodman:

        A regular meeting was held today in the shul with the President, Brother Rosenberg conducting the meeting.

        The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved as read.

 

       It was reported unfortunately that we lost four members almost in one week: Kessler,Tolstoy, Yeger and Sister Wolf. The President asked for an expression of sadness by calling for three minutes of silence to commemorate their memories.

        A motion by Brother Golubetsky seconded by Brother Bellin, that the shul buy three bonds for $75 each was made counted, passed and registered. The President declared the meeting adjourned.

        A. Rosen, Secretary

 

413 HARRY GOLDBERG

      A long-Time Synagogue member, he was an attorney.

 

                          SIXTH AND SEVENTH STREET, ETC.

 

POLICE STATION # 4 – across from Talmud Torah between 4th and 6th on E Street.

 

ST DOMINIC’S CHURCH 6th and E Street, SW.

     The whole neighborhood would attend the church’s annual carnival.

 

JUANITA KAUFMAN NYE HOUSE 6th Street between F & G

       Community neighborhood facility for ping pong, pool, Sunday School and other programs.

 

OLD JEFFERSON JUNIOR HIGH at 6th and School Street

        Our principal, Mr. Hugh Smith, showed a personal interest in every student, with this interest becoming a memory to every graduate of Jefferson Junior High. Jefferson Junior High was still segregated when I attended.

                                      SEVENTH STREET

 400-10 COCA COLA BOTTLING COMPANY between D & E

       Pedestrians could view bottling of Coke bottles through open window.

 505 ASHLEY MOVIE HOUSE

        Open to white population–sometimes called “the dump.” I don’t recall popcorn sales but remember that customers could bring their own sandwiches. In order to entice customers to return to the “Ashcan,” a weekly serial would be added, always ending in a danger scene – example, a person being tied to the railroad tracks and a train approaching, – to be continued the following week.

 

507 PEOPLES DRUG STORE

      Active Soda Fountain. Peoples Drug Stores is now the CVS chain.

 JUDD’s PHARMACY between E & F – Soda fountain with tables.

 RABBI HORWITZ lived at 484 Maryland Avenue, SW

 1121 Robinson Street SW – Home of Lou Gevinson, popular DC prize-fighter.

                                        LAST STORY

  My brother Sam, when going to high school, recalled that he used to work part-time at Mandel’s watermelon store on Maine Ave. Mandel and his neighbor, Mr. Lipsholtz, who also sold watermelons, got into an argument, and both proceeded to throw watermelons at each other. The police came and warned them that if this fight occurred again, they would go to jail.

 I hope everyone enjoyed our BACK TO SOUTHWEST WALKING TOUR.

 Larry Rosen

Rockville, MD

 

07
Sep

CVS QUITS TOBACCO,STRESSES HEALTH CARE

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I previously published a post on CVS’s announcement that it would quit selling cigarettes.

In this morning’s Washington Post , September 4, 2014 this huge drug store chain made it official announcing they have ended tobacco sales at its 7600 drug stores,Wednesday

September 3, 2014 about a month earlier than the original October 1 target in a move that has been viewed as both a public health victory and a calculated business decision

for the nation’s second-largest drugstore chain as it expands its healthcare footprint.

The company which is changings it name from CVS Caremaerk to CVS Health is also launching a cessation program to help smokers quit..

CVS officials have said that banning tobacco from stores shelves will cost the company an estimated $22 billion in lost sales annually out of $125 billion overall.

As previously announced, CVS is also planning a big expansion of its in-store Minuite Clinics from about 900 locations to 1500 by 2017.

Some of CVS’S biggest competitors, including Walgreen and Rite Aid, have not abandoned tobacco sales.

As previously mentioned, cigarettes were exchanged for any other products in Europe after World War II. I recall purchasing two interesting paintings in St. Gilgen, Austria after the War.

A fellow veteran from my army Division who needed microscopes to teach a science class, exchanged 5 cartons of cigarettes for 5 microscopes,when stationed in an Austria city.

I still believe that many folks, will continue to purchase cigarettes, even though they are aware that smoking could damage their health..

23
Aug

Rioting adds more innocent victims to tragic shootings

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August 15

Regarding the Aug. 12 front-page article “FBI will investigate shooting in Mo.”:

The fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a police officer and the subsequent rioting in Ferguson, Mo., brought back memories of the D.C. riots in 1968 after the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated. As in Ferguson, stores were looted and burned. My drug store, Smith Pharmacy at 2518 14th St. NW, and my brother’s building at 7th and S streets NW were burned down. My other brother’s five-and-ten store at Georgia Avenue and Lamont streets NW was looted and all his merchandise stolen.

According to the most informative book on the riots, “Ten Blocks From the White House” by Ben W. Gilbert and the staff of The Post, 1,000 fires in the District caused more destruction than those in any other large U.S. city. The cost of the damage exceeded $27 million (a lot of money in 1968).

Although 46 years have elapsed since the 1968 riots, I still cannot understand why so many businesses and buildings were destroyed when the owners had nothing to do with King’s murder. Likewise, the Ferguson merchants who have become riot victims were not involved in the shooting of Michael Brown.

 Larry Rosen, Rockville
17
Jun

ART OF SHAVING AND HAIR CUTS

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RECENTLY WHEN WALKING DOWTOWN DC  BETWEEN 17TH ST NW AND 18TH, I NOTICED A BUSINESS CALLED “THE ART OF SHAVING” THAT DID NOT HAVE

THE APPEARANCE OF A NORMAL BARBER SHOP.

I WALKED IN AND INQUIRED ABOUT THEIR SHAVING ADVERTISEMENT.

I WAS TOLD THAT THIS BUSINESS OFFERED THE BEST SHAVING FOR MEN AVAILABLE,BY EXPERIENCED OPERATORS-THE ADVERTISED PRICE  OFFERED

A ROYAL SHAVE WITH A STRAIGHT RAZOR $55.00, TRADITIONAL SHAVE $35.00, HAIR CUT $40.00,BEARD/MOUSTACHE TRIM $35.00

I RECALLED MY SHAVING DAYS WHEN I WAS A WORLD WAR II VETERAN–WE USED A SHAVING BRUSH, A GILLETTE RAZOR AND SHAVING SOAP- NO SHAVING

BOMBS ,LIKE RISE, BARBASOL , OLD SPICE ETC. AND QUITE OFTEN THERE WAS NO HOT WATER AVAILABLE.

I REMEMBER ONE GI WHO JUST SHAVED HIS  CHIN!!

ALSO, I REMEMBER GROWING UP IN SW D.C.,713 4 1/2 STREET ,NEXT DOOR TO SAM’S BARBER SHOP–HAIR CUTS ABOUT 25 OR 35 CENTS. ONE BARBER WHO WORKED

FOR SAM, HAD ONE LEG, AND SLEPT IN THE BARBER SHOP DURING THE NIGHT.

WHEN THE BARBER SHOP CLOSED DURING THE EVENING HOURS, THIS BARBER (I FORGOT HIS NAME) WOULD PLAY SOLITAIRE, ON A LEDGE OF THE FRONT

WINDOW. HE DIDN’T LIKE FOLKS LOOKING AT HIS GAME,BECAUSE OCCASIONALLY HE WOULD “CHEAT” A BIT.

TODAY, JUNE 17, 2014 I PAY $16.00 FOR A MAN’S HAIR CUT PLUS A TIP-TOTAL USUALLY AMOUNTING TO AROUND $20.00

YES, THAT’S A BIT HIGHER THAN 35 CENTS–BUT– I UNDERSTAND THAT THE PRICE OF WOMEN’S HAIR CUTS FLUCTUATE FROM AROUND $20.00 TO

A HUNDRED BUCKS DEPENDING ON WHERE THEY GO AND THE SIZE OF THEIR PURSE.

I RECENTLY ASKED MY BARBER WHAT HE CHARGES FOR A SHAVE-HE SAID ABOUT $20.00 BUT NO STRAIGHT RAZORS USED!!

YES -THINGS CHANGE!!!

P.S. I JUST RECALL AN ARMY GI HAIRCUT JOKE–AFTER A GI RECENTLY INDUCTED INTO THE ARMY WAS DIRECTED INTO A HAIRCUT FACILITY TO RECEIVE

A GI HAIRCUT (A HAIRCUT THAT DOESN’T LEAVE MUCH HAIR ON THE CUSTOMER’S HAIR) WAS ASKED THE USUAL QUESTION BY THE BARBER–DO YOU

WANT ANYTHING ON YOUR HAIR??(LIKE HAIR TONIC OR SPRAY)-THE SCALPED CUSTOMER’S REPLAY WAS -NO, MOST OF MY HAIR IS NOW ON YOUR FLOOR!!!!

31
May

VISITING DC PERMANENT NEIGHBORHOOD SIGNS

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The DC Government has established an organization that has erected many  beautiful permanent street signs that contain historical photos and written  articles in different neighborhoods of  the nation’s capital.

The above organization called Cultural Tourism has erected four historical signs with which I am personally  connected.

Three of these signs display a tragic historical event that occurred in Washington, DC during the evening of April 4, 1968. On this mentioned date, the unexpected assassination of the great leader of the civil rights movement Doctor Martin Luther King,occurred,that triggered the DC 68 riot. Unfortunately, during this riot, my DC drug store, Smith Pharmacy,located at 2518 14th Street,NW, and my brother Phil’s building,at 7th and S Street,NW leased to a liquor store operator, were  burned down.

My brother Sam’s neighborhood 5 and 10 located at Georgia Avenue and Lamont Street,NW. was completed looted,with his

entire store merchandise, stolen. All the above mentioned signs are displayed near the former businesses mentioned.

Another sign on display near 4th and G Street SW,displays the work place of my Dad,who was in the business of slaughtering

chickens,ducks, and turkeys,in a specific method, that prepared kosher poultry for his customers.My Dad worked in a SW DC

market store. Fortunately, none of the businesses were harmed during the DC 68 riot.

All the DC neighborhoods where my family members operated businesses have been redeveloped where new residential buildings,

and modern large retailers have established new retail operations.

The SW neighborhood has a water front that is presently being developed into a new beautiful location featuring new buildings

and restaurants, and is certain to attract many visitors.

 

 

 

 

 

31
May

THE WALMART CHAIN CONTINUES TO OFFER NEW SERVICES FOR THEIR CUSTOMERS

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MAY 2014–

Recent newspaper articles have reported that the huge Walmart variety chain has added the following services in their

retail establishmenets–Offering Auto Insurance, Offering transfer of cash to recipients similar to the money transfer operation

offered by the well known Western Union organization, and believe it or not “BANKING SERVICES”.

What other products or services will they offer in the future?

Perhaps Walmart with create an operation similar to Amazon Dot Com.

Oh Yes, the Walmart Chain has opened huge stores in the nation’s capital in DC in neighborhoods that where only small

businesses were located.

As once previously mentioned, perhaps, this huge chain will open Auto dealerships, offering free prizes of merchandise

now on sale in their present stores, with every purchase of a new automobile.

04
Apr

HERE WE GO AGAIN—REMEMBERING THE DC 1968 RIOT –APRIL 4, 1968—TODAY IS APRIL 4, 2014

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YES, HERE WE GO AGAIN–TODAY IS APRIL 4, 2014–THE 46TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE DC 68 RIOT AT WHICH TIME MY DRUG STORE, SMITH PHARMACY WAS

FIRST LOOTED AND THEN BURNED DOWN ON ARIL 4, 1968.

I INVITE EVERYONE TO CHECK  MY POST DIRECTORY TO VIEW THE OTHER POSTS WHICH RECORD MEMORIAL DATES OF THIS IMPORTANT

DATE, APRIL 4 1968. WITHOUT A DOUBT IT IS TIME TO FORGET THE RIOT –UNFORTUNATELY, SOME BAD MEMORIES DO NOT FADE AWAY.

DOC LARRY

WWW.LARRYROSEN.ORG

EMAIL LAZER66@MSN.COM

 

15
Mar

LOOKING BACK AT SMALL BUSINESSES–THEIR EXISTENCE AND THEIR TERMINATIONS

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Like most seniors, I remember growing up in a neighborhood during the 30′s,  where there was a small grocery on just about every corner, many of whose proprietors  moved into a residence and opened their business in the living room, and lived either behind or above the grocery.Small men and women clothing shops, hardware, tailor shops, liquor stores,candy stores,drug stores,shoe repair shops,butcher stores, pop and mom  shops occupied many neighborhoods, and like the small groceries, owners  slept behind or above their businesses.

As time went on, a few large department stores, 5 and 10 variety shops, jewelry stores, super markets, and drug stores opened in the downtown sections of large cities. Most of these

larger retailers restricted their products to what their type of business normally offered for sale.

Around the mid 50′s a few super markets added pharmacies, and health and beauty aids like tooth paste, aspirin, cosmetics, mouth washes etc.

In the Washington DC ,Maryland, Virginia areas some of the small chain drug stores, like Peoples and Drug Fairs, added the sale of groceries,toys, cleaning supplies to their inventory.

More large types of retailers opened their doors in the suburbs of many larger cities as many Americans purchased and rented homes in these suburbs,

Many folks began using credit cards to pay for their purchases which resulted in larger  increases of merchandise sold.

During the 50′s I worked for  a  Drug wholesaler who supplied pharmaceuticals, health and beauty aids, patent medicines to the hundred of small drug stores in the DC area.

As time went on, the Peoples pharmacy chain sold out to the CVS drug chain, and the Drug Fair pharmacy chain sold out to the Rite Aide drug store chains.

Many of the small drug stores could  not compete with these chains and slowly started to close their doors.

Likewise, many small groceries,men and lady shops, shoe shops, and jewelry shops followed suite, abd were forced to close.

Many gas stations started to sell candy bars, soda, coffee, and snacks, discovering that these products were welcomed by gas purchases.Many greeting card and gift shops closed their doors, when the well known Hallmark greeting card chain commenced selling greeting cards to the CVS drug store chain, located near the card shops.

The growth of giant business continued when Service Corporation International commenced to purchase small funeral homes and cemeteries throughout the US.

Additional well known discount corporations, like Wal-Mart, Costco price clubs, that sold a large variety of merchandise has continued to grow.

With the growth of computers, the Amazon.Com corporation first began selling books on line, at a discount, and gradually continued to offer just about any type of merchandise for

sale, enabling the public to make purchases without visiting a brick and mortar star.

At thise time 2014, there began the merging and buy outs of big box corporations of all kinds–Supermarkets Safeway and the Albertons chain merged, Men’s Wearhouse, Jos A. Bank,

giant menswear corps merged, Staples stationery announced it is closing 225 stores by 2015,and the Radio Shack appliance chain is closing many shops.

SO WHO IS GOING TO SELL WHAT PRODUCT IN THE FUTURE???

WILL MOST PRODUCTS ONLY BE SOLD FROM YOUR COMPUTER ON LINE????

WILL SOME BILLIONAIRS CONSTRUCT GIANT VARIETY STORES WHERE YOU CAN PURCHASE AN AUTOMOBILE, BOAT OR EVEN AN AIRPLANE????

TIME WILL TELL

 

 

 

 

 

 

13
Feb

THE CVS DRUGSTORE CHAIN ENDS CIGARETTE SALES

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THE CVS DRUGSTORE CHAIN THAT OWNS AND OPERATES 7600 PHARMACIES HAS ANNOUNCED IT WILL STOP SELLING CIGARETTES.

THIS DECISION ACCORDING TO ITS EXECUTIVES  WILL RESULT IN A $2 BILLION A YEAR LOSS IN ITS ANNUAL SALES.

THE ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE CVS CHAIN WAS PUBLISHED IN THE WASHINGTON POST ON FEBRUARY 6, 2014, AND MENTIONED THAT THIS DECISION

WAS MADE THAT MIGHT  RESULT IN THE PUBLIC RECOGNIZING  THE CVS CHAIN AS A FULL-FLEDGED HEALTH CARE PROVIDER.

LOOKING BACK, I SOLD MANY CIGARETTES IN MY RETAIL CAREER, WHEN I OWNED AND OPERATED A DRUG STORE IN DC, A LARGE GIFT SHOP IN A MARYLAND

HOTEL GIFT SHOP, AND IN NEWS STANDS LOCATED IN OFFICE BUILDINGS.

I CLEARLY RECALL PURCHASING CIGARETTES FOR APPROXIMATLY $2.00 A CARTON, (20 CENTS A PACK, RETAILING THIS PRODUCT FOR APPROXIMATELY 25 CENTS.)

AT THE PRESENT TIME, 2014,RETAILERS SELL CIGARETTES FOR APPROXIMATELY $6.00 TO $8.00 A PACK.

I ALSO REMEMBER SELLING LOOSE CIGARETTES FOR APPROXIMATELY A COUPLE PENNIES  WHEN I WAS A YOUNGSTER, HELPING MY BROTHER PHIL, WHO OWNED SOME PHARMACIES.

WHEN I WAS STATIONED IN AUSTRIA, DURING WORLD WAR II, I NEVER SMOKED,BUT DO REMEMBER ACQUIRING TWO (2)   PAINTINGS FOR  TWO CARTONS

OF CIGARETTES.

ALTHOUGH IT IS A KNOWN FACT THAT SMOKING MANY CIGARETTES,CAN RESULT IN THE SMOKER’S DEATH,MANY INDIVIDUALS NEVER STOP THIS DANGEROUS

HABBIT.

IT WILL BE INTERESTING TO OBSERVE IF OTHER FACILITIES THAT SELL CIGARETTES WILL ELIMINATE THIS PRODUCT FROM ITS INVENTORY OF ITEMS OFFERED

FOR SALE.