16
Jan

PHOTOS OF MY BROTHER PHIL’S DRUG STORES AND DOX LIQUOR

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 On September 14, 2009, I posted memories of my brother’s three drug stores–Standard Pharmacy 7th and S Street,N.W., Economy Pharmacy, 9th and U Street,N.W., and Boyd’s Pharmacy, Georgia and Kenyon Street,N.W., and Dox Liquor on 7th and S Street,N.W., across the street from the previous drug-liquor store.

  As previously mentioned, the original Standard Pharmacy, 7th and S Street,N.W., also had a liquor department. However, when my brother decided to build across the street, a D.C. governing department, informed him, he could not combine the pharmacy items with the liquor.

   Because my brother as a pharmacist was always addressed as “DOC”, he called the liquor store, “DOX LIQUOR.”

 On one sales promotion, my brother invited the former heavy weight boxing champion of the world, Joe Louis. His photos appear.

Links to the photos of my brother’s drug stores and “DOX” liquor follow:

Picture of Phil, Joe Louis and wife Lil

Picture of Phil in front of Dox Liquor

Picture of Phil’s wife Lil working the cash register

Picture of Joe Louis at Dox Liquor

Picture of Joe Louis and Phil at Dox Liquor

Pictures of Dox Liquor Advertisements

Picture of Doc’s employees at Boyd’s Pharmacy

Picture of Boyd’s Pharmacy (outside)

Picture of Boyd’s Pharmacy (inside)

Picture of Standard Pharmacy 7th and S Street

09
Apr

Reb Gedalia-Rabbi George Rosenthal

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Some time ago while attending services at the Ohev Sholom-the National Synagogue, at 16th and Jonquil

Street, N.W. D.C. I spoke to a lady, mentioning that I had grown up in  SW D.C.

She stated that she had a cousin, George Rosenthal who once lived there whose grandfather Rabbi Horwitz

was the first Rabbi of a SW synagogue, Congregation Talmud Torah on E Street S.W.

I responded that I remembered him, and hadn’t seen him since 1943 when I joined the US Army.

Ms Marda Brown, Mr. Rosenthal’s first cousin,gave me his phone number in West Hartford, Connecticut

and I contacted him.

I phoned him, and he remembered me and also many of the former SW residents-and I was surprised to

hear that he had become a Reformed Rabbi.

We exchanged many Emails and many memories dealing with experiences recalled after leaving SW.

About three months ago, when I hadn’t received any responses to a few emails, I phoned the Rabbi and

received a message that the phone was out of service.

I phoned the office of the Assisted Living facility where Reb Gedalia has resided and was told he had moved

out and left no forwarding address.

His cousin Marda also hadn’t heard from him.

I googled “Rabbis West Hartford, Connecticut, and received a message from another Rabbi in that state

informing me that he knew Rabbi Rosenthal, and had heard he had fallen and was in a nursing facility,and

fortunately gave me his contact phone number.

I phoned and reached the Rabbi,and like about 5 friends of mine, including myself, he mentioned that  he had

fallen .

I phoned him some time later, and received a message from his healthcare agent, that he wasn’t doing that well.

On March 21,2016 I received the news from Faith Helene,his healthcare agent that he had died on Sunday

March 20th 2016.

I sent a message of consolation to the funeral home.

The DC SW neighborhood where the Rabbi and I had lived, was completely redeveloped in the late 50’s

and at the present time the entire SW waterfront is undergoing a huge development that will feature condos,

and many retail establishments.

Many former SW residents whom I knew have passed away.

25
Dec

Increase of Mergers

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It is quite obvious that many that many media articles have disclosed the mergers and acquisitions of large corporations.

A merger or acquisition is a combination of two companies where one corporation is completely absorbed by another

corporation. The less important company loses its identity and becomes part of the Aimportant corporation which retains its identity. A merger extinguishes the merged corporation ,and the surviving corporation assumes all the rights, privileges

and liabilitities of the meed corporation.

Regulation is based on the concern that mergers inevitably eliminate competition between the merged firms.

This concern  is most acute when the participants are direct rivals because courts often presume that such arrangements aare more prone to restrict output and to increase prices.The government carefully; scrutinizes  proposed mergers. On the other hand since the 1980’s, the federal government has become less aggresssive in seeking the prevention of mergers.

Having worked for District “Wholesale Drug Corporation,in DC, during the 50’s, and having owned and operated a

neighborhood drug store during the 60’s,I have observed the CVS pharmaceutical corporation acquire the Peoples

Drug store corporation.Also the Rite Aid corp acquired the Drug Fair chain in the DC area and lately the huge

Walgren drug chain acquired the Rite Aide chain.

Recently the following mergers have occurred.

The huge Pfizer pharmaceutical chain merged with alergan group valued at more than 150 billion would create world’s largest drug maker.

Anthem health insurer is buying King Cigna in $54.2 billion deal.US let’s AT&T buy Direct TV for $49 billion dollars.

Ahold NV and Delhaize group would create one of the biggest US supermarket chains.

Many media articles have quoted government officials state that small businesses have provided many jobs-I belive

that the increased growth of Amazon.Com that sells just about any products will force many small retailers out of business.

Amazon.Com doesn’t need to merge-recently it was announced that Amazon.Com will eliminate using the UPS delivering

their packages and acquire their own delivery vehicles.

 

15
Dec

PRICE OF EGGS INCREASE IN POPULAR BREAKFAST RESTAURANT

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Most folks have noticed price increase of eggs in Super Markets.

Recently, a friend and I noticed a similar type increase on the purchase of an egg omelette and some other egg specialties at a popular restaurant.

When I inquired about the small price increase of 63 cents on the invoice total, the cashier showed me a small

sign near the cash register that indicated “PRICE INCREASE ON some EGG SPECIALTIES  .63 -the cash register

receipt printed transaction .63 with a code number.

So what food item  price is going up next? Does anyone remember when the present cup of coffee now retailing close

to $3.00 sold for a DIME???

 

14
Oct

Price of Men’s Dress Shirts and Neckties at NORDSTROM’S

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Recently I had lost some weight and decided to purchase some new pants.

I had never bought clothing at Nordstrom’s located in the Montgomery Mall so I

visited their shop in this shopping center.

As a senior, I am quite aware that prices of all merchandise continues to go up,but how much should the price be for a pair of pants.?

I first asked the sales clerk if there were any sales on men’s pants, and received a negative reply.

We approached the pants department, and the clerk informed me that the pants were $90.00 a pair.

When I inquired if these pants were the least expensive for sale,-the clerk’s reply was yes.

I expected a price in the $40.00 to $50.00 range, but never expected the price quoted.

I then asked the clerk if I could see some men’s short sleeve dress shirts, and told that only long sleeve shirts were available.

I previously had some trouble with long sleeve shirts  but decided to go with the long sleeves=the clerk measured my arms and

then showed me the shirts–lowest price,$55.00.

I recalled that I hadn’t purchased any ties for a while, and also having been around for a few years, knew that the many ONE DOLLAR TIE STORES

had closed their doors many years ago, but was not ready for the $49.50 quoted price for what looked like a nice necktie.

I recall the I  was shocked when I recently purchased  an almond joy candy bar for $1.29 that used to be 5 or 10 cents, and also surprised, that

I had observed that at the present time, packs of cigarettes that I used to sell in a retail store for 25 cents, were being advertised for

$6.00 to$8.00 a pack,—perhaps it’s time to just forget about today’s high prices.

“I’ll take the shirt and tie I  told the clerk”, — The clerk put my shirt and tie in a bag, and said, you’ll still need $12.00 to complete the purchase.

I FORGOT to mention that I had recently received a NORDSTROM GIFT CARD from a family member which I gave to the clerk.

Perhaps I shouldn’t have mentioned that I intended to pay for my purchase with a gift card.

 

 

 

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01
Oct

Magazines distribution history

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From approximately the 50’s through the 70’s, there was only one distributor of magazines,-the New York Times and Wall Street Journal

to all retail establishments that sold this product in drug stores, news stands, book stores etc.

When I owned and operated Smith Pharmacy, 2518 14th Street,N.W.,Washington,D.C. from 1959 to 1968, I purchased magazines from

a company called District News. We placed a standing order for selected magazines which were delivered twice a week with payment

due the second week from delivery date. Sometimes magazines not ordered were also delivered. When the Distributor was informed that

some magazines delivered were not order, the Distributor responded that any magazines not desired or not sold could be returned.

The only problem with this procedure was that all magazines received, included those not ordered had to be paid to District.

I recall that on one occasion, I did not receive my magazines, I phoned the distributor who stated, “You did not pay for the last order,

we sent you”, I responded that my youngest baby son, had just had a serious eye operation and I neglected to remit my payment, the

distributor said, -” the bill is due when rendered”.

In later years when I owned some Newstands and Gift shops, there were always problems when purchasing magazines,when District

News,the only magazine distributor in the DC area, delivered magazines not ordered.

The mark up on magazines was only 20% which was quite low, because often magazines were stolen.

The general population in the DC area, that personally subscribed to magazines from the magazine organizations received a bigger profit

on their purchases than the businesses that acquired their magazines from District News.

At this time, 2015, with the increase of news, articles etc ,shown on the internet,many magazines have gone out of business.

Lately, I’m retired and receive many offers from leading and popular magazine publishers that offer to mail their magazines at a very low

price-much lower than I paid as a merchant. No doubt the magazine distributors can still operate on their sales by selling advertising

to the many different large department stores, real estate firms etc.

Yes Things Change!!

Larry Rosen

www.larryrosen.org

 

30
Aug

GOOD DAYS AND BAD DAYS

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EVERYONE HAS GOOD DAYS AND BAD DAYS.

AUGUST 30, 2015

BASED ON AN ARTICLE IN TODAY’S WASHINGTON POST,, AND OTHER NEWSPAPERS, MANY AMERICAN CITIES ARE EXPERIENCING AN ABUNDANCE OF SHOOTING RESULTING IN MANY DEATHS.TODAY SUNDAY, THE  POST LEAD SENTENCE READS “DESPITE A SHOW OF POLICE FORCE DESIGNED TO CURB A SURGE IN VIOLENCE, THE NATION’S CAPITAL REACHED A DISTURBING MILESTONE FRIDAY NIGHT WHEN A RASH OF GUNFIRE PUSHED THIS YEAR’S HOMICIDE COUNT TO 105-ALREADY EQUALING 2014’S TOTAL “One of  the first Post articles I read,on August  17, 2015,related how a young man, Mathew Shlonsky was struck by a bullet as he stepped out of cab near Seventh and S Street,N.W. The bullet that killed Mr. Shlonskky originated from two young men firing at each other, one of whom was apprehended by the Police Another article related how 24 year old  Derick Black, was shot in front of a bus, near Georgia Avenue and Lamont Street, N.W The Post article , on August 30, 2015 related that hundreds of police officers flooded D.C.’s streets in an “all hands on deck” strategy  meant to make this rattled city feel safer.One of the most horrible murders occurred on a busy metro train when Ken Sutherland,an American University graduate,was stabbed to death,with no other passengers attempting to rescue him.

Many years ago during the late 40’s,50’s and most days in the 60’s, my two brothers operated businesses close to 7th and S Street,N.W. and GeorgiaAvenue and Lamont Street, N.W. locations, experiencing no hold ups, and violence of any kind. From 1959 to April 4, 1968, I owned and operated a drug store-luncheonette on 2518 14th Street,N.W. also recalling no shooting or killing in thisD.C.neighborhood called   Columbia Heights.Again the August 30th Post reported that ,”On Twitter on Saturday, D.C. Council member Kenyan R. McDuffie called the “mayem” a crisis”.We need to treat this violence -particularly the homicides,like a “health epidemic”.City officials have offered explanations that the huge amount of illegal guns possessed by many individuals and the growing use of synthetic drugs,have triggered the escalation of violence.

As mentioned previously,I mentioned that my two brothers, and myself  who operated small retail businesses, in many years ago, never experienced

the multiple shooting and killing that is happening in the nation’s capital and other American cities in today’s times.

Getting back to my title, “Good and Bad Days”, I have to mention that Doctor Martin Luther King’s sudden assassination on April 4,1968, triggered’

the DC 68 RIOT,locally and also in many other American cities.

During the evening of April 4, 1968, my drug store, my brother Phil’s liquor store at 7th and S Street N.W., and my brother Sam’s 5 & 10

near Georgia and Lamont Street,N.W. HAD BAD DAYS, DESTROYED  destroyed during the riot-a riot that Doctor King would never have desired to take place.

On the evening of April 5,, 1968, the D.C. leaders summoned the National Guard to stop the looting and burning.

Perhaps if the present violence now taking place in our Nation’s Capital , the National Guard will AGAIN have to be called in to

stop the current “SHOOTING AND VIOLENCE EPIDEMIC” THAT THE LOCAL POLICE APPEAR UNABLE TO BRING TO AN END.

LARRY ROSEN

BLOG WWW.LARRY ROSEN.ORG

 

 

 

 

 

14
Jun

Updated Post: National Commemoration of the Days of Remembrance

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Judy and I were present, 22 years ago, at the opening of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) in Washington, DC.  There we joined a great many Holocaust survivors and members of US Army Divisions of concentration camps, along with a large number of statesmen and speakers.   We heard Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel and then-President Clinton address the large group.

For quite awhile, Judy and I have been attending an annual program, sponsored by USHMM entitled, “National Commemoration of the Days of Remembrance,” at the US Capitol in Washington, DC.  This program honors concentration camp survivors and US Army Divisions that have been certified by the US Army Center of Military History as Liberating Divisions.

Every Remembrance program includes musical selections by the US Army Band, remarks from the Chairman of the USHMM, presentation of the Division flags, presentation of the colors, singing of the National Anthem, Retirement of the Colors, remarks from Sara J. Bloomfield, USHMM Director, and greetings from well-known speakers.)  Past speakers include, among others, President Barack Obama, President George W. Bush, First Lady Laura Bush, Senator Joseph Leiberman and Secretaries of State, General Colin Powell and Condoleeza Rice.)

Also included at every Remembrance Ceremony is a memorial candle lighting by six Holocaust survivors — each survivor accompanied by a current Senator or Congress person — Hebrew prayers, and a recessional march and music by the US Army Band.

Judy and I, and my son Stan and his fiancée, Venla, attended the most recent Commemoration Program on April 16, 2015, at which His Excellency Gerard Araud, French Ambassador to the US delivered the keynote address.

When the 42nd Infantry Rainbow flag passed by the group, we all saluted ,noting that the Rainbow Division was among those divisions certified as a liberator of the Dachau concentration camp on April 29 1945.

It is a well-known fact that many World War II  veterans have passed away. (When a member of the 42nd Infantry Rainbow Division has passed away, we say that he has passed “over the Rainbow.”)

Not every member of each Army Division was able to enter the respective concentration camp that his division liberated.  Nonetheless, every such division member was recognized as a concentration camp liberator.  I was a member of the 542nd Field Artillery Battalion, but when fellow Battalion members, including myself, were on the way to Dachau, we were informed that, due to a typhus epidemic, our group would not be allowed to enter the camp.

During the April 16 Commemoration Program, the Master of Ceremonies asked that every member of the Liberating Divisions of concentration camps to “Please stand up.”  I expected other liberators to stand up with me, but I discovered that I was the only liberator doing so (Others having passed away or being unable to attend).  I will always remember this occurrence.

I want to add that I was asked to have my picture taken with the large group of Holocaust survivors.  I was happy and honored to oblige.

I will never forget the April 16, 2015 Commemoration of the Days of Remembrance.

Larry Rosen

Member of the 542nd Field Artillery Battalion, 42nd Infantry Rainbow Division, present at activation of this Division on July 14, 1943, at Camp Gruber ,Oklahoma.  Served in the US Army from March 1943 to April 4, 1946. 

 

 

When the 42bs

 

 

10
Jun

NATIONAL COMMEMORATION OF THE DAYS OF REMEMBRANCE April 16, 2015

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For quite a while, Judy and I I  have been attending an annual program, sponsored by the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, entitled “National Commemoration of the Days of

Remembrance ” at the US Capitol, Washington, D.C. This program honors concentration camp survivors, and US Army Divisions that have been certified by the US Army

Center of of Military History as Liberating Divisions.

Every Remembrance program includes the following: Musical selection by the U.S. Army Band, remarks by the Chairman of the US Holocaust Museum, presentation of Division flags,

presentation of the Colors, singing of the National Anthem, retirement of the Colors, Greetings by well known speaker, remarks by Sara J. Bloomfield Museum, a Keynote Address

by a well known individual,(Past speakers have been President Obama,President George Bush, Colin Powell, Condoleeza Rice, and Senator Joseph Lieberman.

A memorial candle lighting by Holocaust survivors and popular politicians,Hebrew prayers, retirement of Division flags, and Recessional by the US Army Band.

Judy, my son Stan and his fiancée, Venla, ttended the most recent Commemoration program on April 16, 2015, at which the the Keynote address was delivered by his Excellency Gerard Araud,Ambassador of France to the US.

When the 42d Infantry Rainbow flag, passed by my group, we all saluted, and recall that the Rainbow division was certified as a liberator of the Dachau concentration camp on April

29, 1945.

There were a few other Divisions also certified as liberators of the Dachau camp.

It is a well known fact that many veterans of the 42d Infantry Rainbow Division have passed over the Rainbow, and that many World War II veterans of other units have passed away.

During the liberation of the many concentration camps, every member of each Army division,was unable to enter a concentration camp–nevertheless,every member of every

liberating Division, was recognized as a concentration camp liberator.

I was a member of the 542d Field Artillery Battalion. When members of my battalion, including myself were on the way to Dachau, we were informed that due to a typhus

epidemic in Dachau, our group could not enter the camp.

During the Commemoration program, on April 16, 2015, a master of ceremonies announced, “WILL ALL MEMBERS OF LIBERATING DIVISIONS OF CONCENTRATION

CAMPS ,PLEASE STAND UP’, I STOOD UP!”–I EXPECTED THAT OTHER CONCENTRATION CAMP LIBERATORS WOULD JOIN ME, WHEN I STOOD UP.

UNFORTUNATELY, THE RESULT WAS, THAT I WAS THE ONLY CONCENTRATION CAMP LIBERATOR STANDING UP.

THIS MEMORY WILL ALWAYS REMAIN IN MY MIND.

I WAS ASKED TO TAKE A PICTURE WITH THE LARGE GROUP OF HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS.

THE APRIL 16, 2015  COMMEMORATION DAYS OF REMEMBRANCE PROGRAM WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN.

LARRY ROSEN

MEMBER OF THE 542D FIELD ARTIL.LERY BATTALION, 42D INFANTRY RAINBOW DIVSION, PRESENT AT ACTIFACTION OF THIS DIVISION ON JULY 14, 1943,

AT CAMP GRUBER, OKLAHOMA

SERVED IN THE ARMY FROM MARCH 1943 TO APRIL 4, 1946

13
Sep

REMEMBERING PENTAGON TERRORIST ATTACK ON SEPTEMBER 11, 2014

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Today is September 11, 2014 and time again to remember the terrorist attacks  that occurred in some major cities on September 11, 2011.

Besides the devastating terrorist attack on the World Trade Center, I especially recall the terrorist attack on a portion of the well known Pentagon building,recognized

as the largest office building in the world.

I especially will always remember the attack on a portion of the Pentagon, because I began working on the premises where it was being constructed in 1942.

After graduating from Central High in D.C. on June 1941, I worked at the Hecht Company department store, 7th and F Street, N.W. as a stock man, and attended George Washington

University in the evenings.

When I attended Central High, my brother Phil, suggested to me that I take a typing course, because it could always come in handy.

I followed his suggestion.

I applied to a government facility that announced it was hiring clerk typists to work in Virginia. I applied to that facility which was a branch of the US Engineers, and was hired

as a typist. I expected to be working in a office building, but was directed to a small wooden Lincoln type shack. I was told this call a time shack, and was the location  where all

construction employees would report to, every morning so that their exact work hour would be recorded. I typed up all the names of the carpenters, electricians, sheet metal employees,

etc who visited the time shack and were checked in.

I still recall that the hourly page for carpenters when I began work was $1.62 1/2 an hour..

The principal contractor for this huge building was John McShain who worked with the US Engineers.

I left my job in March 1943 when I was summoned to join the Army.

When I heard of the unexpected attack on a portion of the Pentagon, I was petrified.

World problems have changed on the 2014 anniversary of the 2011 terrorist attack.
On September 11, 2014, the American president Obama announced that the US would join with friendly country to destroy Isil, a new group that has emerged

in Iraq and Syria, and already chopped off the heads of two American Journalists.President Obama announced that our country and other friendly countries would

perform air attacks in the area of Syria to wipe out this cruel group of murderers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

09
Sep

WALKING TOUR OF OLD SOUTHWEST, D.C., MAY 21, 2006

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WALKING TOUR OF OLD SOUTHWEST, D.C., MAY 21, 2006

      Sometime ago, I was asked by Rabbis Herzfeld and Pollak of my synagogue, Ohev Sholom – The National Synagogue to lead a walking tour in portions of Southwest D.C. The Rabbis knew that I had grown up in SW and attended Congregation Talmud Torah, our original place of worship that later merged with another synagogue, and finally after some moves built the present synagogue at 16th and Jonquil Street, N.W.

       With help from the Jewish Historical Society, Martin Luther King Library, DC Historical Society, DC Historians Jane Levey, and Carol Kolker, SW Neighborhood Assembly representatives Perry Klein and Ron McBee, Minister Brian Hamilton, Carolyn Crouch of Washington Walks, I was able to assemble data and photographs that enabled me to relate my memories of people and places who lived and worked in SW during the 30’s and parts of the 40’s.

         I am happy to report that our tour was a success with approximately 50 to 75 people joining our walk.

                   Rabbi Pollak      Larry Rosen

                                  TOUR PRESENTATION

        Welcome to our SW DC tour. I thank past and present SW residents and everyone for joining us.

        I’m Larry Rosen who, together with my family arrived here in 1927 from Cheyenne, Wyoming, moving into 713 4½ Street, SW, the home previously occupied by Rabbi Yoelson, father of the famous entertainer, Al Jolson.

 

      Originally, this SW section was called “the Island” because it was isolated from the rest of Washington by a canal that was later filled.

        Around 1850, a handful of Jews who recently arrived from Germany opened a few little stores in Southwest, and settled there. Then around 1900 an influx of Russian and Polish Jews arrived in the area, growing to about 190 families in 1920.

       Because little capital was required to open a grocery, most of the immigrants entered this business, borrowing money from relatives or from anywhere else.

       Many newcomers also opened dry goods stores (variety of clothing), as well as tailor, shoe repair, and variety shops with the majority of the proprietors sleeping either behind or above their stores. To make a living, store-owners had to keep their businesses open 12 or more hours a day.

        Many neighborhood Afro-Americans patronized the many mom and pop stores, and I

recall that there existed little crime in SW and that black, white and other ethnic residents all got along.

        Around 1954, massive redevelopment began in SW, with all the dwellings and businesses disappearing by 1961.

      The construction of this Waterfront Mall, the Metrorail and Southwest Freeway, triggered many changes on SW blocks.

        While most tours consist of visiting modern office buildings, luxury homes, universities etc., our tour will focus on the approximate 5 busiest 4½ Street blocks, recalling the life-styles and my memories of some former residents and landmarks.

        We are now standing on what was part of 4½ Street with M on our left and the next street being I. Fourth and L, K, H and F Streets have vanished.

 

                                           MEMORIES

                         900 BLOCK BETWEEN I AND K STREET

        I attended Bowen Elementary School on K Street between 3rd and 4th Street. I recall lots of activities every May Day.

 

921 LEWIS SHOE REPAIR

       The entire family was active in community affairs. Mel Lewis served many terms as

president of Ohev Sholom – The National Synagogue, now resides in Israel. Rose Glazer Lewis was a neighborhood Sunday school teacher.

        When the Lewis family moved out, the Friedman family moved in, also operating a shoe repair shop. Ben and Eddie Friedman have been long-life friends of mine, and Eddie and I were once partners in two small businesses.

911 MARKOWITZ HARDWARE

        I attended Junior High with Irving Markowitz, who became a great trumpet player and joined the well known big bands of Harry James, Glen Miller and others, and was known in the industry as “Marky”.

 

908 TED’S PAWNBROKERS

         Ted operated his business next to his father’s used furniture store. I met Ted when he first arrived from Iowa, and we became good friends. In 1946, I occasionally helped him out in his business. I recall that at this time, the numbers game was popular, similar to today’s lottery, betting on the outcome of three numbers. The difference was that at this time the pastime was “technically” illegal, results being obtained from horse race results. I don’t recall the police authorities arresting many participants. NO Mega Million Games back in those days.

 

907 SNIDER MEATS

      Operated by Louis Snider, father of Jerry Snider, proprietor of the well known “Snider’s Super Market”, 1936 Seminary Road, Silver Spring, Maryland.

 

903 MISS MINNIE’S VARIETY

      Popular selection of penny candy and snacks.

 

901 BASS DRUGS, THEN PAUL’S DRUG & LIQUOR

901 DRUG STORE LOCATION EVEN AROUND 1900

       After Paul’s Drug Store had to move, he moved his liquor license to 5205 Wisconsin Avenue, D.C. and opened exclusive “PAUL’S LIQUOR.” Store sold to Bellman family, my former DC neighbors.

 BOY’S CLUB # 4

        Located on I Street, between 4th and 6th, I played many games of ping pong. Once a losing opponent threw his paddle at me, but fortunately he missed. He apologized.

                                 800 BLOCK BETWEEN H & I

 825 ATKIN GROCERY

       More life-long friends, Joe Sherr, Sid and Harry Atkin. I once worked part-time with Harry Atkin in Business Sales.

 818 JEWELL THEATER

      Movie house—Segregated policy during 30’s and 40’s. Open to Afro-American public who were not admitted to movie houses attended by white public.

 

812 YUTER TAILOR SHOP

       Ann Yuter is a long-time member of Ohev Sholom – The National Synagogue. Her

brother Morris lives in Annapolis.

 807 GREENBAUM’S BAKERY LATER RUBINSTEIN BAKERY

       Great Jelly donuts, and 11-cent delicious rye bread. Donuts, in my opinion were tastier than “Dunkin Donuts” and less expensive.

 801 HYATT CLOTHING

       During World WAR II, my brother Sam, while in the Army and stationed in Richmond, Virginia, needed an apartment. By chance he met Sid and Lou Hyatt who were in the real estate business, and they came to the rescue.

                                700 BLOCK BETWEEN H & G

 CORNER 4th AND G AMERICAN FILLING STATION

       $3.00 could possibly fill most of the gas tank. During World War II, ration tickets needed to purchase gas. No self-service or credit cards. Oil and other fluids checked without request.

 723 VORONOFF HARDWARE

      Rolls of oil cloth, popular floor covering, always displayed outside on the street.

 721 ROSENBERG CLOTHING

        Mr. Rosenberg, one of the founders of Talmud Torah Congregation and very active. One of his daughters worked in the White House.

 716 SCHNEIDER HARDWARE

        Always well-displayed window, with running electric trains available during Xmas season.

        During SW redevelopment, when asked to vacate premises, she and fellow store-owner Max Morris sued with the case going all the way to Supreme Court. They lost their case in 1954 when the Court ruled the Redevelopment Land Agency could destroy private buildings in order to improve the overall neighborhood.

 

722 RUBINSTEIN VARIETY

      Headquarters for candy, snow balls, ice cream, snacks. Lou Rubinstein and I both members of the same Jewish War Veterans post.

 

715 MILLER TINNER

       Similar to sheet metal shop. Family arrived from Lithuania and spoke only Yiddish. Fortunately I could speak that language. Later when they learned the language, I would visit the family and join them when they listened to a daily radio program, called “Jack Armstrong, the All American Boy”, sponsored by Wheaties, “Breakfast of Champions.”

       When the Millers moved out, the Friedmans moved in, operating a shoe repair. I remember their son Albert always wore a white shirt.

 

713 ROSEN SHOCHET AND MOHEL

        My father’s profession was a “Shochet and Mohel” – As a Shochet, he slaughtered poultry in a prescribed manner according to Jewish law, and as a mohel, he performed circumcisions. The going price to kill and pluck the feathers of a chicken was 15 cents. At first, my Dad worked in the back yard, but later he worked in a corner section of Paul Clarke’s live poultry store at 1105 Maine Avenue.

                                               

       This is me walking down 4th Street, carrying a chicken to deliver to a customer.

 

       When we first moved into 713 4½ Street, lighting was provided by gas jets protruding from the wall that did not produce good lighting—later we got regular electricity.

 

       We had no oil or gas heat—just coal, and my job was to occasionally bring coal from our garage into a separate small structure in the yard called a “summer kitchen” where the furnace and another stove were located. To get hot water it was necessary to light a hot water heater.

When we first moved into the house, we had no refrigerator. Like many folks, we had an ice box and had to wait for the ice man to bring in blocks of ice. Also, no washing machine—clothes were washed in tubs and later placed on clothes line to dry.

 

       Back in those days, we had no TV, VCR, DVD, PALM-PILOT, BLACKBERRIES, BLUEBERRIES etc. We did have a radio and an upright “Victrola” record player, the top of

which could be locked and used as a “mini-safe.”.  We had a telephone. I still remember the number, Franklin 4209. No area code, and no zip code necessary when mailing a letter with a 3 cent stamp.

 

       Rent was $40.00 a month. Better deal than some folks nowadays having to pay $20,000 or more for permanent parking spots in high-rise buildings.

 

 

                               Here is a photo with my father.

 

 

711 SAM THE BARBER

 

        Hair cuts were 25 cents. One of Sam’s barbers would sleep in one of the barber chairs at night and often would play solitaire at the store-front counter.

 

700 SHERMAN’S LIQUOR

 

       Mr. Sherman provided a neighborhood service when he would install loud-speakers on the outside of his store so that many SW residents who had no radio could listen to the broadcasting of champion Joe Louis’s prize fights. Huge crowds would gather every time Joe Louis had a match.

         In front of the store was a police call box, used when a police officer could summon a police car to send a vehicle to pick up a violator. (Cell phones were not yet on the scene).

 701 SANITARY GROCERY

       Later became Safeway. No self-service or check out counters. Each item to be purchased had to be called out to the clerk who would add up the total by adding machine or by hand.

 

                               600 BLOCK BETWEEN G & F

 

630-32 SPERLING’s MINI DEPARTMENT STORE

       Paul Sperling, active synagogue member, both at Talmud Torah and Ohev Shalom – The National Synagogue for many years. He now lives in Baltimore.

 

        Carol Kolker, who published an interesting dissertation on SW, interviewed Paul

Sperling for her work. Quoting from her dissertation, “Paul Sperling’s father Sam Sperling began work in America as a greenhorn peddler, on NY’s lower East Side. Later, he came to DC and rented a house at the corner of 4½ G St., opened small store. We worked as much as 20 hours a day. Within 10 years, Sperling bought the building next door, tore everything down and built big home. When kids came home from school, they did their homework, then helped their parents in the business. His mother did all the cooking and then she took care of the books and then she waited on customers. One day when he left for school, his mother was arranging a window display and when he returned home for lunch, “she had a baby.”

 

618 HORNSTEIN BUTCHER SHOP, later WEBBER’S BUTCHER SHOP – where we

bought our meat products.

 

609 MORGENSTEIN BAKERY – later sold to Rosenblum family.

 

607 VOLNER ANSHI SVART SYNAGOGUE

        Founded in 1908. Name eventually changed to Beth Shalom after moving to different locations. Now at 11825 Seven Locks Road, Potomac, MD. Prayers slightly different from Talmud Torah.

 

601 LIFSHITZ SHOCHET AND BUTCHER

        I was a frequent visitor to the family. I recall a tasty snack prepared by Mrs. Lifshitz. She would heat some butter in a frying pan. Everybody got a slice of bread and was invited to dip their bread in the melted butter – delicious.

 

622-624 SCHOOLER’S DRY GOODS, then liquor store at 624

      Purchased by Bernie Green. I worked part-time for Bernie.

 

476 F St. between 4th and 6th – Former home of Rabbi Joshua Klavan and family.

 

                               500 BLOCK BETWEEN F & E

 

523 JACK KLAVAN, PAWNBROKER

      Brother of Rabbi Joshua Klavan. Jack Klavan’s son Stanley became a judge.

 

516 CHERNIKOFF CLEANER

       Son Harry and I, as kids, rode three-wheel tricycles. Harry became first president of Share Tefilah Synagogue and when he worked for the VA, he assisted many World War II veterans in obtaining entitled benefits.

 

512 KEISER RESTAURANT

       Operated by Hymie Keiser, long-time acquaintance. Hymie had along career in the insurance industry.

                                              

                   CONGREGATION TALMUD TORAH 467 E St. SW

 

        Began in home of Isaac Levy on 4½ St. in 1880. Met in member’s homes until the synagogue was completed in 1903.

        Remained in E St. Building for almost 50 years until redevelopment, and then was razed. Moved to different locations, then merged with Ohev Shalom 5th and Eye St., finally moving into the present building in 1960 on 16th and Jonquil St. NW.

        Rabbi Moshe Horwitz served Talmud Torah from 1912 to 1935, then Rabbi Joshua Klavan became Rabbi in 1936 until his death in 1953 at which time, his son, Rabbi Hillel Klavan was appointed Rabbi and served for 48 years.

 

     Rabbi Shmuel Herzfeld, our current Rabbi, is doing a great job in bringing in many new members and providing interesting programs.

        Rabbi Yossi Pollak has, likewise, performed a great job as Assistant Rabbi.

        My father was the recording secretary of Talmud Torah Congregation from 1933 to 1944. His recorded minutes written in Yiddish are located in the Ohev Sholom – The National

Synagogue’s memorabilia room.

 

      Here’s a translation of a small portion of a meeting dated December 28, 1941, by Doctor Chana Benjamin, daughter of Barbara and Leonard Goodman:

        A regular meeting was held today in the shul with the President, Brother Rosenberg conducting the meeting.

        The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved as read.

 

       It was reported unfortunately that we lost four members almost in one week: Kessler,Tolstoy, Yeger and Sister Wolf. The President asked for an expression of sadness by calling for three minutes of silence to commemorate their memories.

        A motion by Brother Golubetsky seconded by Brother Bellin, that the shul buy three bonds for $75 each was made counted, passed and registered. The President declared the meeting adjourned.

        A. Rosen, Secretary

 

413 HARRY GOLDBERG

      A long-Time Synagogue member, he was an attorney.

 

                          SIXTH AND SEVENTH STREET, ETC.

 

POLICE STATION # 4 – across from Talmud Torah between 4th and 6th on E Street.

 

ST DOMINIC’S CHURCH 6th and E Street, SW.

     The whole neighborhood would attend the church’s annual carnival.

 

JUANITA KAUFMAN NYE HOUSE 6th Street between F & G

       Community neighborhood facility for ping pong, pool, Sunday School and other programs.

 

OLD JEFFERSON JUNIOR HIGH at 6th and School Street

        Our principal, Mr. Hugh Smith, showed a personal interest in every student, with this interest becoming a memory to every graduate of Jefferson Junior High. Jefferson Junior High was still segregated when I attended.

                                      SEVENTH STREET

 400-10 COCA COLA BOTTLING COMPANY between D & E

       Pedestrians could view bottling of Coke bottles through open window.

 505 ASHLEY MOVIE HOUSE

        Open to white population–sometimes called “the dump.” I don’t recall popcorn sales but remember that customers could bring their own sandwiches. In order to entice customers to return to the “Ashcan,” a weekly serial would be added, always ending in a danger scene – example, a person being tied to the railroad tracks and a train approaching, – to be continued the following week.

 

507 PEOPLES DRUG STORE

      Active Soda Fountain. Peoples Drug Stores is now the CVS chain.

 JUDD’s PHARMACY between E & F – Soda fountain with tables.

 RABBI HORWITZ lived at 484 Maryland Avenue, SW

 1121 Robinson Street SW – Home of Lou Gevinson, popular DC prize-fighter.

                                        LAST STORY

  My brother Sam, when going to high school, recalled that he used to work part-time at Mandel’s watermelon store on Maine Ave. Mandel and his neighbor, Mr. Lipsholtz, who also sold watermelons, got into an argument, and both proceeded to throw watermelons at each other. The police came and warned them that if this fight occurred again, they would go to jail.

 I hope everyone enjoyed our BACK TO SOUTHWEST WALKING TOUR.

 Larry Rosen

Rockville, MD